Print Page | Contact Us | Report Abuse | Sign In | Register
ROOF TALK
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: BUSINESS  SAFETY  LEGAL  TECHNICAL  MEMBERS IN THE NEWS  WSRCA UPDATES  COVID-19 

A View From the Hill - Political News: Proposed DOL Overtime Rule

Posted By Craig Brightup, The Brightup Group LLC, Tuesday, March 26, 2019


 

by Craig Brightup, The Brightup Group LLC


On March 7, the U.S. Dept. of Labor (DOL) released a proposed regulation to update the salary-level test for determining when a “white collar” employee is exempt from earning overtime. The Obama Administration issued a regulation in 2016 that would have doubled the salary level from $23,660/year ($455/week) to $47,476/ year ($913/week), but it was halted by a federal judge in a challenge led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce on the basis that the threshold was so high it made the duties test no longer relevant and thus was beyond the statutory authority of the Secretary of Labor. That decision is currently on appeal in the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals while the Trump Administration proposes a more modest update to the overtime regulation, which was last adjusted in 2004.

The proposed rule raises the threshold to $35,308/year ($679/week) and, as advocated by business organizations, reverts to methodology used in the 2004 rule that focused on the 20th percentile of full-time wage earners in the lowest income region of the country (identified as the South) and the retail industry as the baseline. It also makes no changes to the duties tests and has no auto-update feature, both of which are key points for business as well. However, the regulation does seek comments on conducting regularly scheduled rulemakings to update the salary threshold.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE...

Western States Roofing Contractors Association

---

Not a Member of Western States RCA?  Click Here to Join!
or call Toll Free 1-800-725-0333

Tags:  BUSINESS  LEGAL 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

OSHA Provides Much Needed Clarity on Post-Incident Drug Testing and Safety Incentive Programs

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, March 11, 2019

Courtesy of: WSRCA Legal Advisor, Cotney Construction Law

 

In 2016, OSHA published its final rule amending 29 C.F.R. § 1904.35 to add a provision prohibiting employers from retaliating against employees for reporting workplace injuries. Since then, employers within the roofing and construction industries have been hesitant to conduct post-accident drug testing for fear of violating the new rule.

Employers can now breathe a sigh of relief as OSHA recently clarified its position on workplace safety incentive programs and post-incident drug testing. The good news is that employers are still permitted to conduct post-incident drug testing and implement safety incentive programs to promote workplace safety and health.

Specifically, OSHA stated that permissible drug testing includes: random drug testing; drug testing pursuant to state and federal laws; and, most importantly, post-accident drug testing to determine the root cause of the incident that harmed or could have harmed employees as long as the testing is not limited to the employees who reported injuries. Employers should now feel comfortable conducting post-accident drug testing of employees so long as they do not target the specific employees who reported the accident and instead test all those whose conduct may have contributed to the accident.

Further, OSHA clarified its position on incentive programs stating that positive action taken under a program that rewards workers for reporting near-misses or hazards is always permissible under the rule. OSHA also clarified its stance on the more controversial rate-based programs, (i.e., providing bonuses to employees for injury free months of work) stating that they are permissible under the rule as long as they are not implemented in a manner that discourages reporting.

Therefore, as long as employers implement adequate precautions to ensure that employees feel free to report injuries, OSHA will not take negative action against the employers for negative action against employees (i.e., withholding of bonus). Adequate precautions include: inventive programs to go along with rate-based programs that reward employees for reporting hazards in the workplace; and training programs that reinforce the employee’s right to report and not face employer retaliation.

 

---

Trent Cotney, CEO of Cotney Construction Law, is an advocate for the roofing industry, General Counsel of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA), Florida Roofing & Sheet Metal Contractors Association (FRSA), Roofing Technology Think Tank (RT3), Tennessee Association of Roofing Contractors (TARC), National Women in Roofing (NWIR), and several other local roofing associations. For more information, contact the author at 866.303.5868 or go to www.cotneycl.com.

 

 All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  LEGAL  SAFETY 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)
 

5 Keys to Increase Word of Mouth Referrals in your Roofing Contracting Business

Posted By Matt Ward, Breakthrough Champion, Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Contractors, and specifically roofers rely heavily on word of mouth referrals for new  business. In fact, when I speak with contractors across the country and conduct informal  polls during my speaking sessions, I see that greater than 90% of the room indicates that  referrals are the number one source of new business for their company.

Yet, even with such high numbers and importance on referrals, less than 10% indicate that  they have a process to grow their word of mouth referrals in a much more predictable  fashion.

Most business owners tell me that their way of getting more word of mouth referrals is to  ask, however in discussions, they quickly find that asking never works. It puts the person  asked in a very difficult and uncomfortable situation of being forced to respond.  So let’s dig  into what really does work!

1. Start with a caring mindset. Word of mouth referrals are a byproduct of caring. They  are a direct result of you putting forward information and care toward others. When  you care for others, they recognize you in ways that you don’t ask for. They will  actually tell many more people about your caring nature and why they should do  business with you! When you show up constantly for others, they want your business  to be a success, as such, they refer you! You can asses how well you care about  others through a free self-assessment at www.ICanCareMore.com

2. Over Deliver - Find ways to over-deliver with your customers, partners and referral  sources. There are a number of ways to do this, including quality, time of delivery,  amount of communication, and many more.  Each business is unique in how they  operate their respective business, so you need to take a look at your business and see  how you can over-deliver in ways that are meaningful to your customers.  Consider  how you deliver your product.  Are there ways you can give your customer something  memorable?  When your product or service is a roof, that might be tough, but you  can find ways to stand out, be unique, and over deliver. In fact...I challenge you to do  just that! 

3. Listen - Listening is key to getting more referrals. When you listen to others, they  notice, because your gifts, your care, your words, and your actions show clearly that  you know them well and that you listened to them. Often when I am conducting  workshops or seminars around the country we get knee deep into the weeds of  listening and we talk about multiple ways that you can listen.  The two most common  ways to listen are with your ears and your eyes. The ears are what we know and are  used to, but the eyes, that’s a whole different approach.  Using your eyes, to listen to  what people are sharing on their personal and professional social media channels.  These posts tell you a story about who they are, and what they are about.  Using this  information you can effectively connect with these contacts on a more deeper level  and with much more intentionality.

4. Surprise - When you surprise your contacts (both customers and non-customers) you  leave an impression that is memorable, resulting in a story.  It’s these stories that  others share and creates word of mouth referrals. Consider ways that you can  surprise people, whether it’s in your operations, delivering, communication, or simply  just when they haven’t heard from you in a while, you appear, full of joy and  recognizing them!  I’ll never forget the time that I read an article by a friend, and  buried in that article was a single sentence professing her love of chocolate covered  bacon. I immediately bought some for her and shipped it to her. She then posted all  over social media about the surprise gift. Not only was she pleased that I listened to  what she was saying in her article, but she was completely surprised!  Finding ways  to surprise others is so rewarding!  I highly recommend it and it does, in fact, produce  more referrals. It did for me!

5. Non-Self Serving Acts - When you can do things for others with no intention of  gaining anything in return, it shows. The recipient will never feel like they are being  manipulated into a sales conversation, and this is key!  When you put the focus on your contact and you do things in service of them, it’s a win-win for all! One example  of how I achieve this is I give away books that I believe are helpful to others in  growing their business. This shortlist of books (4 of them) were powerful for me and  help me start, run, grow, and ultimately sell my business.  I order multiple copies of  these books and keep them on my bookshelf for easy mailing. When I ship out a  book, I write a custom note in the cover, making it personal and sharing with the  recipient why the book was helpful for me. 

Finally, stay in touch. With all 5 of these keys, what is most important is that you stay in  touch with your contacts, constantly touching base and letting them know that you are there  for them, sharing information with them, and being available.  Showing up in others lives is  keys to getting more word of mouth referrals. If you stay in touch, without asking for sales  you will get more referrals. 

Tags:  BUSINESS 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

OSHA Flying into the 21st Century with Drones

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Friday, February 15, 2019

 

---

Courtesy of WSRCA Legal Counsel: Trent Cotney, Cotney Construction Law

 

 

 

Early last year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced the start of an all new approach to its safety inspections—through drones. Since its introduction, at least nine inspections were conducted with camera-enabled drones. Of these nine inspections, the majority were used due to hazardous circumstances on-site such as a recent collapse, fire or explosion.

 

Drone usage during safety inspections provides OSHA with a quick and detailed view of an employer’s facility, and possibly a more expansive view of what might have been seen by an in-person inspector. While this might be good for OSHA as it significantly cuts down time needed to perform such an inspection, employers should be wary of the ramifications.

 

The good news? Drone usage for OSHA’s safety inspections doesn’t come without restriction. In an eight-page memo addressed to its regional administrators on May 18, 2018, OSHA laid out the guidelines and procedures it must adhere to in order to use Unmanned Aircraft Systems (“UAS”) a/k/a drones. One established limitation on this type of inspection is employer consent. This means that employers have the right to say no to the little robot flying above your worksite. But is “no” really the best answer?

 

Although employers have a 4th Amendment right to object to the expansion of an overbroad search, this doesn’t necessarily mean that you should deny OSHA the ability to inspect your site through drone usage. By making this objection, OSHA is then required to obtain a search warrant to inspect your property. This objection, only delaying the inevitable, might not be worth getting on OSHA’s bad side. Instead, see if you can work with OSHA to create a limit in the scope of the search and participate in the drone flight planning, which in turn will help address concerns regarding the expansive view that comes with drone inspection.

 

Another concern to watch out for is the possibility of OSHA being granted its request for a Blanket Public COA from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This Blanket Public COA will allow OSHA to use drones anywhere in the country. If granted, it is unclear how the employer consent will play into this, if at all.

 

---

 

 

LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

 

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  LEGAL  SAFETY 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

You Are Invited to Roofing Day in D.C. 2019

Posted By Alec Ward, Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Friday, February 15, 2019


 

You Are Invited to Roofing Day in D.C. 2019


YOU NEED TO BE THERE!
Roofing Day in D.C. 2019
April 3-4
Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill
Washington, D.C.


On April 3-4, the roofing industry will come together in Washington, D.C., to meet with members of Congress on Capitol Hill. We will deliver our message about the most important legislative issues affecting the roofing industry and your business, including reducing regulatory burdens and addressing workforce shortages. We need you—and hundreds of fellow roofing professionals from all sectors of our industry—to participate to make sure our message is heard loud and clear. This is a unique and exciting opportunity as we will take over Capitol Hill and speak with one voice as a united industry!

What's included
The event includes a program with speakers and advocacy training beginning at 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 3, followed by a networking reception from 5 to 6:30 p.m. The training will prepare you for how to best communicate with members of Congress and their staffs, and you will be provided with issue papers to present to your senators and representatives. Your Congressional appointments will be scheduled for you; they will start on Thursday, April 4, at 9 a.m. and continue throughout the day. We will have a reception at a Capitol Hill restaurant that evening for those interested in unwinding and sharing stories. All you need to do is show up and join your roofing industry colleagues in delivering our message with one voice!

Who should attend
It’s important for Congress not only to hear from company owners and managers but also from frontline workers. This year, we’re introducing a special registration rate of only $25 for roof system installers. We strongly encourage you to bring one or more standout crew members to help share the industry’s story during Roofing Day in D.C. 2019. Congress needs to hear from all segments of the industry!

Register now!
Registration for Roofing Day in D.C. 2019 is only $75 for company representatives and $25 for roof system installers. Visit nrca.net/roofingday to register, make your hotel reservations and for more details. We encourage you to make your hotel reservations now, as we have a limited room block at the Hyatt Regency Washington, and it will sell out. If you have any questions, please call NRCA’s Washington, D.C., office at (800) 338-5765.

See you in D.C. April 3-4, 2019!
nrca.net/roofingday



Sincerely,
Western States Roofing Contractors Association

Not a Member of Western States RCA? Click Here to Join!
or call Toll Free 1-800-725-0333




Follow WSRCA on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn



  

 

Tags:  WSRCA UPDATES 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Roof Coatings Review: How Chemistry Impacts Quality

Posted By George Daisey, The Dow Chemical Company, Friday, January 25, 2019

Courtesy of: George Daisey — The Dow Chemical Company

---

Installing or restoring a roof can be a tremendously complicated endeavor. There are single ply membranes, roof systems, coatings, concrete, metal and many more variations to choose from, which leads anyone to ask what substrate do I choose? To add further complexity, within the coatings option alone there are a variety of product types available: silicone, acrylic, polyurethane, and asphalt? Each presents notable features, strengths, and weaknesses to consider.

 


ROOF COATINGS MARKET OVERVIEW

 

The roof coatings market in the Unites States is a growing, vibrant market. According to data from the US Census Bureau combined with Dow internal analysis, it’s estimated the total US Construction Market is valued at approximately $1.1 trillion. Roofing is a little over 1% of that total which still represents a staggering $14 billion value. Within the scope of roofing, is a bright and shining market called roof coatings. The roof coatings market is rapidly approaching 6% of the total roof market with a value of approximately $780 million (see Figure 1.). There are many factors contributing to this growth but I will mention just one: the ever-aging building inventory. As buildings get older it becomes more common that two roof systems have already been installed and doing a third roof system either means tearing the first two completely off and starting over, or applying a maintenance product like a roof coating. In terms of cost savings and less impact on the environment, roof coatings win that debate almost every time.

 

In terms of growth, all three of these market segments can be described as healthy and growing. The same sources of information describe the total construction market growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.2%. The $14 billion roofing segment is growing at 5.2% CAGR, and the roof coatings segment is humming along at a 4.7% CAGR. Compare this to the US GDP (Gross Domestic Product) which during the same period grew at a modest 2.4% CAGR. During that same period the US GDP was valued at $17.9 trillion; the US Construction market represents over 6% of the total US GDP. All these numbers simply show that these markets are large, vibrant, growing and poised to continue delivering advancements.

 

 

 

 

In fact, if we look at data spanning 2011 through 2016 we see the US roof coatings market growing at a rate of 5.2% CAGR, and that rate appears to be steadily increasing year over year. Starting from a total market value of $653 million in 2011, the growth rate has steadily increased on average to reach an annual growth rate in 2016 of 7.8% CAGR.

 

 

The two fastest growing segments in the roofing market are Thermoplastic Polyolefin (TPO) membranes and roof coatings (see Figure 2.). The tightening regulations on energy efficiency and lowering Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) have fueled demand for energy-efficient and low VOC products like TPO membranes and roof coatings.

 

Roof coatings show steady growth but indicators express the fastest growing portion of the roof coatings market is in higher performing coatings. It is easy to drive volume with lower cost products, but when growth is seen in higher value portions of a segment, there is good news for all parties. This means the customer is moving towards higher performing products that will deliver more value and longer service lifetime. The contractor is able to capture more value by selling and installing higher value products, and the manufacturer is also benefiting by offering the contractor higher value and higher performing products.

 

 

WHY CHOOSE A ROOF COATING

 

With so many choices for roofing, why would you choose a roof coating? There is no one answer to this question. Roof coatings come in many varieties not limited to water-based, solvent-based, reflective, non-reflective, thick-film, thin-film, white, black and all colors in between. Where do I start?

 

First, let’s answer the question posed above; why choose a roof coating? The first answer that often comes to mind is sustainability. In the United States alone, more than 251 million pounds of waste finds its way to landfills and nearly 40% of that waste comes from construction projects1. According to a Construction and Demolition Recycling article published in March 2018, global construction waste will double from the 1.3 billion ton total in 2012 to 2.2 billion tons by 2025. Identifying volumes of particular waste products is often difficult due to the variety of classes assigned to waste products; although certain roofing materials like shingles, asphalt and concrete are often mentioned in published waste studies.

 

If we truly want to offer sustainable products that make a difference to our environment, roof coatings are a great way to accomplish this objective. The application of a roof coating can extend the life of an existing roof and minimize the need to tear off a roof and send those materials to a landfill. In fact, whether the roof coating installation is new or retrofit, regularly scheduled recoating of that roof can reduce the need to landfill the original roofing assembly and lead to a viable solution for that roof. Looking for a sustainable solution? Then roof coatings are your answer!

 

How about sustainability from the standpoint of energy consumption? Energy efficiency is becoming more important to everyone. From the building owner dealing with utility bills to the occupants dealing with comfort level of the built environment, energy efficiency and performance of buildings is important. One of the most impactful jobs I ever participated in was a production facility where the building owner needed eight HVAC units to cool the building and office areas still never reached below 76 degrees. The roof was a black surface and the owner hired a contractor to convert the roof to a reflective surface by applying a reflective roof coating. After the installation, the owner stated that he was able to shut down three of the HVAC units and maintain a comfortable 72 degrees in the office spaces. That’s a win for everyone involved from contractor to owner to occupant.

 

Climate change is a hot topic almost everywhere you go, from construction sites to conference room meetings; even to your social media conversations. Everyone is talking about climate change, the environment and our planet. We all want to live better. Whether you believe reports of global warming, global cooling, and climate change or subscribe to none of it, constructing sustainable buildings and saving energy enables us to build a better future. Roof coatings can be a huge part of any sustainable, energy efficient building design project.

 

A building owner or other key decision-maker is often confronted with the choice of maintenance versus capital investment for a roofing project. A capital investment often means the cost of that roof installation is depreciated over many years; whereas a maintenance project can often be deducted in the same tax year. Most roof coatings installations fall under the maintenance category which allows the building owner to deduct the costs immediately. Note, tax laws change frequently; always check with your tax advisor to verify. This life cycle cost analysis compares two roof maintenance scenarios to demonstrate the value of roof maintenance.

 

Easy – and quiet – installation is a winner and roof coatings can deliver this in almost every situation. When a tear-off and complete roof assembly installation is done, there is often major disruption of building activities as well as areas around the building. Large trucks hauling materials in and waste out.

 

Sections of the parking lots cornered off to allow for trucks and materials to be moved and stored. Let’s not forget the dust and debris generated during construction. But many roof coatings jobs can be done in “stealth mode.” Buckets, drums or even totes of roof coatings can be delivered to a job site and transported up to the roof without many people aware that it is happening. I’ve personally been on jobs where the buckets are transported up a service elevator to the roof and the occupants do not know the roof is being coated!

 

We choose products because we want them to perform well. Roof coatings not only protect the existing roof and extend its service life, but roof coatings can deliver measurable performance. A roof coating may offer one or more of the following performance benefits: extended service life, water resistance, waterproofing, enhanced solar reflectivity and/or thermal emittance. Often, a roof coating enhances the appearance as well be transforming a dingy, dirty roof into beautiful colors ranging from basic white or black to a variety of highly decorative shades.

 

Selecting a roof coating for its variety of benefits is a first step. Now comes the hard part – which type of roof coating do I choose? Let’s explore some of the most common options on the market today, including their benefits, challenges and typical service life.

 

 

ACRYLIC

 

Acrylic roof coatings can be based on 100% acrylic or styrene-acrylic copolymers. Focusing on 100% acrylic roof coatings, these coatings offer excellent durability as well as the following typical properties: UV resistance, good permeance, dirt resistance, water resistance, and abrasion resistance. Acrylic coatings are water-based, easy to apply, easy to cleanup, and cure times can be tunable from several hours down to several minutes. Acrylic coatings are often installed as coating-only, but a growing sub-segment of acrylic coatings is as part of a liquid-applied membrane. Those familiar with acrylic decorative paints are familiar with a wide color palette, but for roof coatings that can vary. Steep slope thin film roof coatings can be supplied in a diverse color palette, but low slope elastomeric acrylic roof coatings are limited to white or light pastel colors. Deeper colors in these elastomeric coatings are possible to formulate but these colors often do not hold pigment as well, which leads to other technologies being used when deep colors are required. Acrylic roof coatings are limited to good weather conditions during installation because they are water-based. Excessive humidity or extreme temperatures can limit the success of an acrylic roof coating installation. Constant exposure to ponded water is also challenging for most acrylic roof coatings, resulting in impaired adhesion, blistering and delamination. However, the formulating space for acrylic roof coatings is wide; hence coatings can be formulated into anything from an economy coating up to an exceptionally high performing, durable coating. This variety makes acrylic roof coatings a great choice for the contractor looking for anything from an economical, low service life roofing solution up to a multi-decade lifetime roofing solution.

 

 

STYRENE-ACRYLIC

 

Styrene-Acrylic copolymers are a subset of the acrylic roof coating technology and should be treated separately. At a fundamental level, the styrene monomer is not as UV stable as the acrylic monomers used in roof coatings. Combining styrene with acrylic monomers to form a styrene-acrylic copolymer can deliver good performance properties; however, notably high performance is difficult to achieve versus the juggernaut of acrylic-acrylic copolymer interactions. In the roof coatings market, styrene-acrylic coatings are usually found in the economy space or in the lower warranty products. The good news is that styrene-acrylic roof coatings do have some notable performance properties, including excellent adhesion to metal and concrete and re-coats over existing acrylic roof coatings.

 

 

SILICONE 

 

Silicone roof coatings are all the buzz in the roof coatings industry. These coatings are not water-based and come in either low solids (~67%) or high solids (~98%) formulations. Silicone roof coatings are extremely resistant to water absorption, with some products literally having 0% water absorption according to standard ASTM D471 tests. The silicone polymers used in these coatings are UV light stable, do not degrade when exposed to sunlight, and thus offer one of the highest service life guarantees of any coatings option per installation. For commercial roofing, ponded water areas are the most challenging space on a roof for any coating, but silicone roof coatings are specially designed to perform well in those high moisture situations. A few challenges do exist for silicone roof coatings; including the need for primers over most surfaces, poor asphalt bleed resistance, difficulty to recoat, and low abrasion resistance. However the long service life and water resistance make the silicone roof coating a popular choice for low slope commercial roofing. Due to the slippery nature of the surface on a silicone roof coating, they are often not recommended for steep slope roofs.

 

 

POLYURETHANE 

 

Polyurethane (PU) chemistry delivers some noteworthy properties versus the coatings already discussed. A PU roof coating will often offer exceptionally high tensile strength and elongation versus other technologies. In situations where high tensile strength, toughness and chemical resistance are desired, PU roof coatings are an excellent choice. Adhesion and water resistance are often very good with PU roof coatings. It is important to note that PU coatings can come in either aromatic or aliphatic type chemistries. Only the aliphatic type are UV stable and offer long-term durability. These coatings are solvent-based and do need specialized spray equipment separate from either silicone or acrylic.

 

 

ASPHALT

 

Asphalt coatings are the oldest technology discussed in this article. The use of asphalt can be traced back to the ancient cultures like Greece and Babylon2. In fact, the earliest known use of asphalt dates back to around 615 B.C. when King Nabopolassar paved the streets of Babylon with asphalt and burned brick so he could have easy access in and out of his palace. In modern day roof coatings, asphalt coatings come in a variety of forms. There is traditional hot mop asphalt where the solid asphalt is heated and melted before being rolled or broomed onto a roof. Newer versions of this black color coating are in emulsion form where the asphalt is emulsified in water either through mixing with surfactants or high pressure processes. Further differentiation is between traditional black asphalt coatings and the newer silver or reflective asphalt coatings. Both in solvent and water-based emulsion form, the reflective asphalt coatings fit in a niche space between non –reflective and highly reflective roofing products. Hot mop asphalt and cold-applied asphalt emulsion are often applied to the roof as the waterproofing layer. With their near-zero permeance and hydrophobicity, there is no better waterproofing coating for roofing than asphalt coatings. These basecoat/primer coatings can then be top-coated with reflective aluminized asphalt or acrylic roof coatings. In some cases, the desire is to have a black surface so the asphalt coating is the final coat as well. The reflective aluminized asphalt coatings have good solar reflectivity and low thermal emissivity giving them a significant energy value proposition. Lifetime expectancy of aluminized roof coatings have improved over earlier incarnation of the technology due to improved formulation quality and refinement of the aluminum flake. In climates or situations where both very high reflectivity and emissivity are not desired, the moderate energy performance of the aluminized roof coatings can be the best choice.

 

 

SEBS 

 

Styrene Ethylbutylene Styrene or SEBS coatings are solvent-based coatings that offer excellent water resistance and very low permeance. Often SEBS is positioned against acrylic roof coatings as having an extended season of use; not as subject to the cold temperatures encountered in the shoulder seasons. SEBS coatings can be described as super-hydrophobic and will have a moderate service life versus silicone or acrylic roof coatings. The challenges for SEBS coatings include high VOCs and limited color option; typically only sold in white according to leading distributors of the product.

 

 

POLYUREA

 

Polyurea roof coatings are a very small percentage of the roof coatings market, but they offer an excellent property balance and can be the right choice for many roofs. Polyurea roof coatings are great waterproofers, have excellent chemical, abrasion and corrosion resistance and have an extended application season versus water-based systems. Some of the challenges are high VOCs and the reactive chemistry. An acrylic roof coating will dry by evaporation of water typically over a few hours, whereas the polyurea chemistry is reactive causing the coating to cure in a matter of seconds. The applicator must have a high skill set to spray this type of coating. Exterior durability is moderate, but long service life is never the driver for polyurea coatings; it is usually the chemical resistance or waterproofing properties that drive the use of polyurea.

 

 

PVDF

 

Polyvinylidene Fluoride or PVDF coatings are different from the previously discussed coatings in many ways. First, they are not applied to commercial roofs in thick films. Often a PVDF roof coating is applied at 2 to 4 dry mils thick. The cost per pound of a PVDF coating is much higher than other technologies, but is counter-balanced by the performance it can deliver in a thinner film. The benefits of PVDF over other coatings include improved dirt pickup resistance, long-term reflectivity, long-term durability, water repellency and mildew/algae resistance. Colors are no challenge for PVDF as they can be supplied in a diverse color palette. The main challenge is balancing the hardness and toughness of the PDVF coating versus the flexibility of the elastomeric basecoats often applied before the PVDF coating. PVDF coatings have advanced over the years and though earlier versions suffered from cracking issues, newer offerings have improved their crack resistance. It is always a challenge to apply a hard, rigid coating over a soft flexible coating, which must be understood by the contractor/applicator.

 

 

CONCLUSION

 

There are a diverse variety of roof coating technologies available in the North American market. Each roof coating technology has its noteworthy balance of properties and features that need to be understood by the buyer and user to determine the best option for intended use. Beyond roof coating product properties, type of substrate, service life, maintenance planning, sustainability benefits, and cost are considerable factors to help the coating chosen to meet the needs of the job.

 

---

 

1 Mike Hower, Marketing Communications Manager, Carbon Lighthouse, 2013

 

2 https://actionasphalt.net/storied-history-asphalt-pavement/

 

---

 

LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

 

Tags:  TECHNICAL 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

OSHA Updates Final Crane Operator Ruling

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, January 21, 2019

 

Courtesy of Trent Cotney, Cotney Construction Law

---

Per OSHA’s publication in the Federal Register on November 9, 2018, the requirements for crane operator certification will take effect on December 10, 2018, and the requirements for employers to evaluate/document crane operators will take effect on February 7, 2019.

Further, OSHA stated that the new crane operator certification will be limited to certification based on equipment type and that OSHA will not be enforcing the requirement that certifications identify a lifting capacity for the certification. This decision was made in order to maintain current industry practices and avoid confusion on construction projects. The decision and effective dates mean all crane operators must be certified by December 10 of this year and all employers must begin evaluating and documenting the evaluations by February 7, 2019.

While testing organizations, such as the National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO), are not required to issue certifications rated by lifting capacity, they are still permitted to do so. Crane operators will need to ensure they meet the minimum operator requirements outlined in the rule, 29 CFR 1926.1427. The rule requires employers to ensure crane operators receive training, evaluate operators for their ability to safely operate crane equipment, and document the evaluation.

In sum, employers and crane operators must act fast to ensure they both meet the new criteria set forth by OSHA. Exactly how OSHA will enforce the new requirement is yet to be seen but employers should be ready and have guidelines in place for project inspections.

---

LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  LEGAL  SAFETY 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

5 Signs Your Roofing Business Needs Accountability

Posted By Chris Alberts, Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, January 14, 2019
Updated: Monday, January 14, 2019

 

 

Courtesy of: Rebekkah Anderson, WiseElephantConsulting.com

 

---

 

While running a business, it can take time to get to the root of a problem. To speed up the investigation process, we've compiled five signs that your roofing business might need more accountability!

 

 

1. Your Overhead is Through the Roof

Pun not intended, but you can still roll your eyes if you feel the need. If you find that your bookkeeper is starting to raise squiggly eyebrows at some of the numbers you've been pushing out, you might have an accountability problem. You might also have an even bigger problem if you are still running all of the numbers yourself and haven't had a chance to hire an accountant. Getting a regular accounting audit with improvement recommendations can help you know where your overhead is getting too large.

 

The roofing industry has pretty great information about profit margins, vertical returns, and industry growth metrics to benchmark your business against. Don't let it all come out in the tax season.  You could find there are many missing receipts, mis-documented paperwork, or adjusted estimates that didn't get turned in correctly to be invoiced out to customers.

 

Last year, I heard a roofing contractor say their team had to squeeze to make payroll because they had lots of customers, but $1.5 million in accounts receivable heading into the Christmas season! A good accountant pays for him or herself! Use them to find where your business procedures need more accountability.

 

 

2. You Keep Losing Good People

This is especially true for those of you who are trying to grow. You see someone with potential, they start to shine, and as they hit their prime, they leave or burn out. This could be because the rest of your team is de-motivating them to succeed with lack of accountability.

 

If you team doesn't have accountability metrics to see who is performing well and who is not, it's hard to reward those who are doing it right. If you don't have a great incentivization structures built in place for your new and old staff, you will see your good people slowly leave as they realize their work isn't valued.

 

Those that do stay, realize they don't have to work as hard because no one else is giving it their all. This leaves you with the sub-par team and higher overhead. Don't wait till you lose your best crew members to keep people accountable.

 

 

3. Your Team Appears Unmotivated

This might come through as having no sense of urgency. Your team doesn't really understand why it's so important to the homeowner to show up on time or to leave early. You keep getting requests for personal days off, and it's like pulling teeth to get people to show up for make-up days! This doesn't come as a surprise to many roofing contractors today. You might be blaming it on the new generation's work ethic, but your team is disengaging.

 

Keeping your team accountable to show up, have great service, and come through for the customer means setting performance metrics in place for each team member and individual. Have clear expectations and clear ground level requirements. One business owner I know created tiers of excellence rewarded by a 25 cent hourly bonus for each tier of excellence. The first tier started with just showing up to work on time and in a clean uniform.

 

Whatever is your biggest struggle and most important to your roofing business' future should be in your first tier incentive before being eligible for further incentives. Keeping your team engaged through accountability means your business will be more profitable.  Gallup reports 22% higher profitability and 21% productivity for workers who were engaged in the workplace.

 

 

4. Customer Complaints & Negative Reviews Take Up More Than 1 Hour a Month

If you're handling more than an hour a month of negative feedback from your customers, managers, project leads, digital reviews, (or community even), you have an accountability problem.

 

Your team should be responsible to represent themselves and your roofing business well wherever they go. If you wear the company logo, you wear the company values. This accountability needs to happen at all levels of the company internally and externally.

 

Many times, this is an area roofing contractors don't equate with an accountability problem, but your customers will tell you otherwise if you listen! They know pretty specifically what it was that made them upset with your business if you take the time to ask. Did I mention that if you solve this one you will gain about a 90% level of trust within your local area? With 88% of customers trusting online reviews almost as much as a personal referral, you can't afford to lack accountability.

 

 

5. You Have a Low Lead to Customer Conversion Rate

This is absolutely an accountability problem.  No matter how many times your sales team tells you the marketing team didn't give them quality leads, or your just aren't getting enough leads period, you have accountability as an issue.  It could be where you're spending your marketing budget, it could be a sales person refusing to ask for the sale, or it honestly even be how your front office person answered the phone today!

 

A low conversion rate means your customers are going with someone else or refusing to buy, AFTER they became a business lead.  You must track all parts of your customer's life cycle and measure it against benchmarks in order to know where the accountability problem lies.

 

A low lead to conversion rate is probably the hardest problem to overcome as a roofing business (because there are so many moving pieces involved), but the most financially rewarding problem to fight. Did you know that in the construction industry the average sales conversion rate is 22%? I was actually a bit shocked by this one!

 

Creating strong accountability systems within your roofing business will save you from mistakes, give your more time, limit frustrations, and keep your best team members for the long haul. If you need help knowing where to start, give us a call! Wise Elephant Consulting helps roofing contractors save money and grow their businesses strategically.

 

 

 

Tags:  BUSINESS 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WSRCA Exhibiting at CRA Tradeshow, Jan. 24th 2019

Posted By Alec Ward, Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Thursday, January 10, 2019

Later this month, we'll be out in Denver exhibiting at Colorado Roofing Association's annual trade show. Be sure to stop by our table (located right up front) to learn about the benefits of WSRCA Membership, and how they can save you time and money!

Since 1985, CRA's annual Table Top Trade Show has been a low cost opportunity to make great new contacts with over 1000 installers, builders, architects, manufacturers and applicators of roofing products and services.

ATTENDEES

The show  is a great chance to catch up on the latest industry trends, to make important contacts with suppliers and to compare existing products and services. The trade show offers a great networking opportunity for you to make and reaffirm business and personal contacts while educating you and your employees on the newest in Colorado’s roofing industry.

Admission is Free, but we do ask that you register in advance

Member CIUs = 1 per person.

 

FREE PRE-SHOW SEMINAR | 10AM TO 11AM
Collecting Payments on Construction Projects

All businesses want to get paid for the work that we do. As a contractor, subcontractor or construction company, you are solely responsible for putting the necessary measures in place to ensure you are paid promptly. This course provides a description of the methods contractors can use to collect amounts owed on construction projects. In particular, the course addresses key contract provisions; construction lien law basics; & private, state & federal payment bond claims.  Co-Presentors: Danielle Maya and Dillon Fulcher.

Seminar Cost:            Free

Seminar Start Time:   10:00 a.m. 

Seminar Room:          Forum Room #3

 Seminar Beverages Sponsor: 

Tags:  WSRCA UPDATES 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

IBC & ASCE 7-16 is Changing - WSRCA's Bottom Line

Posted By WSRCA, Tuesday, December 18, 2018

 

It has come to the attention of WSRCA’s Low-Slope and Industry Issues Committees that the 2018 International Building Code (IBC) is continuing to be adopted by more jurisdictions in the Western U.S. Please be aware that there are changes in the 2018 edition of IBC’s Chapter 15 for Roofing and its companion Chapter 16, which relates to wind-uplift resistance. These changes adopt, and requires use of the relatively new 2016 edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers “ Minimum Design Loads And Associated Criteria for Buildings and Other Structures” – (ASCE 7- 16 Standard) to determine wind-uplift design pressures for roof system attachment/securement. These changes are relatively complex, and Contractors may want to contact the Roofing Manufacturer for direction regarding roofing attachment (e.g., mechanical fastening schedules) or securement (e.g., low-rise foam adhesive bead size and spacing schedules). Contractors may also desire to carefully consider the potential affects (e.g., increase) with some materials, and labor for any additional mechanical attachment, foam adhesive, or other related roof securement needed.
 

Executive Summary:


Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) believes that it is important to alert you to the value of being aware of changes to the code, as not knowing could have a dramatic effect on the success of any roofing or reroofing construction business.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE...


Western States Roofing Contractors Association
356 Digital Drive - Morgan Hill, CA 95037
Local: 650-938-5441  Toll Free: 800-725-0333
Email: info@wsrca.com

---

Not a Member of Western States RCA?  Click Here to Join!
or call Toll Free 1-800-725-0333

Tags:  TECHNICAL 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Zero Net Energy: Optimizing Energy Performance on the Roof with Spray Polyurethane Foam and Photovoltaics

Posted By WSRCA, Monday, December 10, 2018

By Rick Duncan, Ph.D., P.E.,

Technical Director, Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance (SPFA)

---

The sustainability focus in buildings has shifted lately to one on energy performance. Not only have building codes become more stringent, with a much greater emphasis on energy efficiency, but many incentives have been introduced and made available to owners, providing them with tax credits and savings for the integration of renewable energy sources such as solar onto their homes and projects.

Increasingly ambitious movements, including Passive House and Zero Net Energy (ZNE), are also gaining in popularity as immediate issues like climate change, and the catastrophic effects of it, are top-of-mind and ever present in the news.

Even though ZNE is a bigger energy goal than what is currently highlighted for many structures, architects, builders and owners are increasingly integrating sound energy practices in their buildings. As a key component of the building enclosure, roofing systems tend to transfer (i.e. lose) significant amounts of energy if not properly designed or well maintained. Thus, it is unsurprising that they are a key focus in buildings designed to minimize energy use.

Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) and Photovoltaic (PV) systems are now, more than ever, utilized together on the roof as a complete solution for energy savings. SPF reduces demand for the energy generated by photovoltaics, which can make a significant difference in ZNE buildings. When combined, they provide a joint solution for the generation of renewable energy, the conservation of heating and cooling energy, and, ultimately, the elimination of the structure’s dependence on fossil-fuel consuming electricity sources.

Regardless of whether ZNE is the end goal, SPF and PV integrated in roofing are an ideal combination for many structures, providing unparalleled return on investment through energy cost savings, as well as numerous additional benefits. However, contractors should be mindful of some important installation considerations when looking to join these two powerful systems on the roof of a building, to ensure highest possible performance and lifespan.

 

PV System Overview

PV cells are the basic unit used to convert light to electricity. Many PV cells are bundled together to make a PV panel, or module. PV panels are grouped electrically to create a PV string. And depending on the system size, two or more strings are combined to create a PV array.

The dominant type of PV panel used with SPF roofing is cSi, or crystalline silicon. cSi is a typically rigid panel with glass frame and metal frame and may be applied, unlike other dominant PV panel types, via rack installation methods.

A photovoltaic system includes many components in addition to the panels. Components include racks, rails, rooftop attachment devices, grounding systems, wiring and wiring harnesses, inverter(s), and connection to the main electrical panel. Components may also include control modules and storage batteries for off-grid PV system installations.

Photovoltaic panels must be handled and maintained with caution. Electricity is produced when a single panel is exposed to light, however, because a panel is not part of a circuit, that electricity will not flow until the circuit is complete. A worker may complete the circuit by connecting the two wires from the backside of a PV panel.

When maintaining a PV system, it may become necessary at some point to disconnect or remove an individual panel from a string or an array. The whole system must be shutdown properly as a precautionary measure to prevent shocks from occurring to workers and arcing between electrical connections. This “shutdown” procedure must be followed with precision as part of a lock-out/tag-out program and is provided by the inverter manufacturer. Under no circumstances should SPF contractors ever disconnect or decommission a PV panel or system unless they are trained and qualified to do so.  

 

Rooftop PV Installation Types for Use with SPF

Rooftop PV systems can vary significantly in size. Large footprint buildings can employ PV systems rated from 50 kW to 1000 kW or larger while residential rooftop PV systems are commonly 3 kW to 5 kW solutions.

Rooftop PV systems may be installed either on racks or adhered directly to the roof surface. When looking to combine PV with SPF, it is generally not advised to adhere or place the PV panels directly onto the roof surface. Solar heat as well as water can accumulate between the PV and roof coating and can negatively impact coating performance.  Moreover, panels applied directly to a low-slope roof will, in nearly all cases, not optimally align with the sun, which will reduce energy production. 

Non-penetrating rack systems may be placed directly on a rooftop and held in place with ballast. Racks may also be installed with penetrating supports that require flashings. Each type provides advantages and disadvantages. For example, ballasted racks may block water flow and affect drainage, while penetrations require leak and maintenance-prone flashings. SPF is unique in that it easily self-flashes around penetrating supports.

 

Design Considerations

Rack-mounted arrays with penetrating attachments are fairly lightweight at two to three pounds per square foot, and ballasted arrays add four to six pounds per square foot. With the latter however, more ballast is utilized at the perimeters and corners of a PV array. Thus, localized loading from ballast may reach as high as 12-17 pounds per square foot, which must be considered. Most SPF roofing systems have a compressive strength of 40-60 psi. 

PV panels add weight to a rooftop and this must be factored into the design and installation. Existing structures should be analyzed by a structural engineer to determine if the additional weight of the PV system is acceptable.

Additionally, roofs are required by codes to provide “live load” capacity, a measurement, which includes people, snow, and other temporary weight-bearing scenarios that may occur. The weight of a PV system is typically below the live load capacity, however in the absence of a structural analysis, the live load capacity will be reduced by the addition of the PV system. A final consideration is whether a PV installation will create new locations for drifting snow, which may add considerable weight to a roof, and must be factored in.  When determining key considerations for wind load and fire safety, best practices require deferral to the PV supplier.

Drainage on rooftops is important for safety of the structure and longevity of the roof. PV arrays often have many points of contact with a roof, and these are possible locations that will block or slow drainage.  PV racking should be positioned to minimize ponding water, and/or include methods such as notched pads to allow drainage under points of contact, especially for ballasted systems. 

Photovoltaic panels convert approximately 15-20 percent of light to electricity, leaving the remaining unconverted energy to be released as heat. Additionally, PV panels are more effective when their temperature drops. It is for each of these reasons that the majority of rooftop PV installations are designed to encourage airflow under panels, which reduces the temperature of the panels, improves conversion efficiency and releases heat effectively. Photovoltaic panels installed 4 to 5 inches above the roof will not change the temperature of the roof and, instead, provide shade to the surface of that roof. This additional shade may extend the life of SPF roof coatings.

 

Service Life and Maintenance

Ideally, a roof system, whether SPF or another material, and the PV system should have the same expected service life.  Removal (decommissioning) and reinstallation (re-commissioning) of a PV system is costly, and the cost should be weighed relative to the residual service life of the existing roof and cost of roof replacement or recoating at the time of PV installation.  Ballasted, rack-mounted PV systems are difficult, if not impossible, to reroof (or recoat) under and around.  Elevated racks with adequate space beneath may be able to be left in place when reroofing.  A PV system that covers, for example, 10% of the rooftop will be easier to relocate during reroofing than a PV system that covers 75% of the rooftop.  Building owners should be advised of future reroofing and maintenance costs with roof-mounted PV systems. 

The life expectancy of the SPF roof system should align with the service life of the PV system, and coatings factor in as they can extend the life and improve performance of SPF on the roof.

Roof systems used as platforms for PV systems must be tough and durable, and generally speaking, SPF has greater compressive strength as density increases. Higher density SPF systems may be preferred, especially when ballasted support systems are used. 

An SPF system will be stressed during the installation of the PV system and coatings and granules will help protect the roof during this time, and during scheduled maintenance. Because a roof surface below PV panels will likely not dry as fast as non-covered portions, coatings that stand up better to standing water and biological growth should be selected.  Installation of PV systems on SPF roofing will inevitably create additional foot traffic. It is important to protect heavily trafficked areas with additional coating and granules or walk pads. The cost to do so is low and will protect the service life of the roof.

All roof mounted PV systems should be inspected and maintained at least twice a year. Wiring, attachment points and flashings should be inspected and cleaning of the top surface of the PV panels may be required.

To maintain and service the roof and PV system, workers must be able to access both. PV systems should not block access to drains, penetrations, flashings, mechanical units or other rooftop equipment. Similarly, PV systems should be installed so maintenance workers can access wiring, inspect panel-to-racking connections, and properly clean top surfaces without stepping on PV panels.

 

Summary

In closing, while there are many considerations to the application of PV systems in combination with SPF roofs, the complete energy generation and conservation solution provided by the two integrated systems performs notably well. The energy cost and earth saving benefits are both undisputable and hard to ignore.

 

About the Author

Rick Duncan, Ph.D., P.E is the Technical Director of the Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance (SPFA), the industry’s leading organization representing contractors, material and equipment manufacturers, distributors and industry consultants. The SPFA promotes best practices in the installation of spray foam and offers a Professional Certification Program to all those involved in the installation of the product.

 ---

 

LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

 

Tags:  TECHNICAL 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Western Roofing Expo 2019 Exhibit Floor Has Sold Out!

Posted By WSRCA, Friday, December 7, 2018

 

All 85,000+ square feet of exhibit floor space for the Western Roofing Expo 2019 has been reserved in record time, over six months before the floor even opens!  Held June 9-11 at the Paris Las Vegas, the exhibit floor has officially SOLD OUT.  Fast becoming known as the premier regional roofing and waterproofing event in the United States, the Western Roofing Expo features a two-day trade show, 20 educational seminars, an amazing welcome party & lively-silent auction, unbeatable networking, and live product demonstrations every hour.

If you missed your opportunity to reserve a booth, contact WSRCA today and get on the 2019 wait list.  There's still a chance to be here!


Western States Roofing Contractors Association
---

Not a Member of Western States RCA?  Click Here to Join!
or call Toll Free 1-800-725-0333

Tags:  WSRCA UPDATES 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Introducing Interior Protection for Reroofing Projects

Posted By Dana Whedon, TuffWrap® Installations, Inc., Friday, December 7, 2018

Roofing professionals face a myriad of challenges when assessing a reroofing project. Each facility is different and so is its roof. But one challenge that can be easily overlooked is what happens on the inside of the facility when work is being done on the roof outside.

It is well-known that dust and debris can easily find their way into a facility while reroofing is taking place. Dirt, metal shavings and pieces of roof deck are all potential contaminants. Even in the case of a simple overlay, the movement of the crew on the roof can disturb existing dust on the interior high structure areas. It is important that all project participants and customers understand the potential risks to the inside of the building and what their options are to avoid them.

If the facility does not seem to be sensitive in nature, it may seem acceptable to skip this step in the planning process. Regardless of the upfront perceptions around offering interior protection, many commercial/industrial roofers and roofing consultants have determined from experience that not unlike an insurance policy, professionally installed dust and debris containment is worth the time and investment.

This is because sensitive products are not limited to food, beverages and pharmaceuticals. Anything being manufactured, stored or displayed can be impacted by the introduction of reroofing dust and debris.

And the risk is not limited to products. If people will be inside the building throughout the reroofing activities, interior protection provides an extra level of assurance about their safety. Many times, a business cannot close or stop production during reroofing, making an ongoing clean up schedule impossible. Interior protection allows the work to continue safely without disrupting operating schedules.

So how does interior protection work? In the case of reroofing, a suspended cover is hung below the roof deck to capture falling debris. It is generally a reinforced poly that when installed properly, is fully sealed around any penetrations to avoid dust infiltration. In addition, many providers offer added material options such as antimicrobial, antistatic and flame resistant. The suspended cover is installed prior to the roofer beginning the tear off and is removed by the interior protection provider post-project.

If during the project planning, it is determined that interior protection could be beneficial, the next step is to contact a provider. Like any contractor in the construction business, an interior protection provider should have specific qualifications. The installation team should be OSHA certified, lift certified and professionally trained to install the solution. Ideally, they should have the ability to work with your project schedule and have a project manager readily available to address questions and concerns. Most importantly, their suspended cover solution should meet NFPA 13 in order to avoid compromising the fire sprinkler system.

Fire sprinklers are usually located in the same area where the suspended cover is installed. This would normally create an impairment. However, the interior protection industry has options to avoid this challenge. It is important to choose a provider that has the ability to install a solution that meets NFPA 13, allowing the fire sprinklers to function as designed.

By introducing interior protection upfront, any confusion or misgivings about the interior of the building is avoided. Throughout the project duration, customers can continue to utilize their facility without worrying about negative impacts to their products or daily operations. Ultimately, dust and debris containment not only contributes to overall success of the reroofing project but it gives the customer peace of mind.

Dana Whedon
Marketing Manager
TuffWrap® Installations, Inc.
www.tuffwrap.com

 
TuffWrap® Installations, Inc. is an innovative dust and debris containment company providing interior protection solutions to a variety of industries undergoing construction projects. Protecting our clients, their products and their brands from dust and debris is our priority.

Tags:  BUSINESS  MEMBERS IN THE NEWS  TECHNICAL 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

1st Winner in WSRCA Sign-In Raffle Announced

Posted By Alec Ward, Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, November 19, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, December 4, 2018

 

Congratulations to our 1st winner of the WSRCA Sign-In Raffle, Carrie Galera of Tacoma Roofing & Waterproofing! Just by signing into the WSRCA Member Area, Carrie was automatically entered into our raffle and is now the winner of a $100 Visa Cash Card!

We'll be drawing two more winners from now until the end of the year. To participate, all you have to do is sign into the WSRCA website. A winner will be randomly selected at the end of each month.
 
 
While you are signed in, take some time to explore the site and discover the valuable features available to you!
 
Regards,
 
Alec Ward | Director of Membership
Western States Roofing Contractors Association
275 Tennant Avenue, Ste 106 - Morgan Hill, CA 95037
Local: 650-938-5441  Toll Free: 800-725-0333
Email: alec@wsrca.com

Tags:  MEMBERS IN THE NEWS  WSRCA UPDATES 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

'Cool Roof' Legal Debate in Denver, Colorado

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, October 29, 2018

A year after passing “green roof” law, Denver suddenly the focus of 20-year “cool roof” debate

New law would force affected property owners to choose between creating green space, installing solar panels and saving energy.  

Courtesy of: The Denver Post  


The days of sprawling black roofs in Denver may be ending — but they won’t go quietly.

The Denver City Council will decide Monday whether to create a “cool roof” law for the city. The big hope is that requiring reflective, light-colored roofs on large buildings would lower ambient temperatures, fighting back against the city’s heat-island effect. “It’s not groundbreaking in Denver, but it’s one of the biggest” of the new cool roof laws, said Kurt Shickman, executive director of the Global Cool Cities Alliance.

“They’ll join a small number of big cities.” The change would affect new construction and reroofing projects for buildings over 25,000 square feet — not your typical home renovations. The new law also would force affected property owners to choose between creating green space, installing solar panels and saving energy. And, for once, many developers are looking forward to a new rule: It would replace the “green roof” law that voters approved last year, which would have required more costly rooftop gardens. The proposal has the support of green-roof organizer Brandon Rietheimer.  

 

Roofers vs. reformers

But even this smaller change has put the city in the middle of an ongoing debate between roofers and reformers. The council on Monday is likely to hear from industry representatives who say that the cool-roof mandate is an oversimplified approach for a complicated problem.

“Mandating a single component of a roofing assembly is just not what is good design practice,” said Ellen Thorp, associate executive director of the EPDM Roofing Association, which represents manufacturers of EPDM, a rubber membrane for roofs.

The trade association argued in a letter that cool roofs can cause two major problems in colder climates like Denver’s. First, they can purportedly accumulate moisture. Second, they are meant to retain less heat, which means heating bills can be higher. “Some of the best roofs on the market really were not going to be allowed, period,” said Jeff Johnston, president of the Colorado Roofing Association, who says that much of his Steamboat Springs business is still focused on dark roofs.  “Why eliminate it?”  

 

Attempting to adapt

The reason is simple, according to Katrina Managan, the city staffer who coordinated the roof revision. “The reason to do them is to adapt to climate change,” she said.

Denver could see a full month of 100-degree days in typical years at the end of the century, according to projections from the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization for a “high” warming scenario. And the impact will be worse in urban areas, where dry, unshaded rooftops and pavement are baked by the sun and heat the air around them. Urban environments can average up to 5 degrees hotter than the surrounding rural areas, and the difference can be much greater at times, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Cool roofs address part of that problem: They reflect the sun’s energy away and stay up to 60 degrees cooler than traditional roofs, the EPA reported. “It will save Denver a tremendous amount of money. It will create a huge amount of benefit through cooling. And it will set the example,” Shickman said. “It really does add to the argument that says we really should be considering this for almost all of our big American cities.”

City research found that the cool roof mandate would be more effective than the green roof initiative in combating heat, since the green roof requirement only covered parts of rooftops.

 

The bottom line?

Major cities began adopting cool-roof requirements nearly 20 years ago, with northerly Chicago among the first. It’s been joined by Philadelphia, Baltimore, New York City and Los Angeles, among others, according to GCCA. Much of the southern United States is now covered by the requirements, and San Francisco in 2017 adopted the first “green roofs” requirement.

“We’ve been in an epic fight between the industry and those of us on my side who are trying to push this forward,” Shickman said. Thorp, the EPDM Roofing Association representative, pointed to research to argue that Denver should proceed cautiously. Because cool roofs don’t get as hot, they can accumulate more condensation, which requires specialized designs to combat.

And she said that a cooler roof could mean higher heating costs and thus more carbon emissions in colder Denver. She acknowledged that the law would hurt sales of EPDM: Competing materials are cheaper and more popular for cool roofs. But she said that her clients also make those other materials. “They’re going to make the sale one way or another,” she said. Shickman countered that the companies are more heavily invested in EPDM, and therefore have a financial motivation to lobby against cool roofs.

Other materials “have been eating the lunch of EPDM,” he said. Thorp declined to disclose sales figures for the companies, but said the organization’s “primary driver” was to give roofers options. Cool roofs are already popular A city poll of roofers found that about 70 percent of new roofs in Denver are “cool.” “What we’re tending to find is most companies now are wanting to go to a light roof,” said Scott Nakayama, director of operations for Denver-based North-West Roofing.

“The amount that they’re going to save, as far as heating and cooling bills, tends to stand out.” His company has been installing about 20 light-colored roofs per year, and hasn’t encountered any of the issues raised by the EPDM Roofing Association, he said. Shickman points to this apparent lack of complaints as evidence that a well-designed cool roof can avoid moisture and other issues. They do come at a cost premium: Cool roofs can cost about 1.5 percent more than a traditional roof, according to city-commissioned research by Stantec, the engineering company.

Thorp said that estimate is too low. If the law is approved, it could take several years before it starts to have a regional effect, since roofs generally only need replacement every 20 years.

The rest of the details Under the change, developers of new builders can choose among the following options.

·       Install green space on the building or on the ground.

·       Pay for green space somewhere else.

·       Install renewable energy or a mix of renewable energy and green space.

·       Design the building for 12 percent energy savings compared to city standards, or achieve 5 percent savings plus green space.

·       Achieve either LEED Gold or Enterprise Green Communities certification for green design.

Existing buildings will have similar types of options, with different details.  

---

LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  LEGAL  TECHNICAL 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 3 of 8
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8