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Contractors Counsel: Does California’s New “Gig Worker” Law Affect the Construction Industry?

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, October 21, 2019

Courtesy of: Trent Cotney, Cotney Construction Law

The foundation of California’s immense economy is based upon three industries: entertainment, technology and tourism. These industries heavily rely on “gig workers,”, individuals who provide paid services to multiple companies simultaneously and who have traditionally been classified as independent contractors. This structure is very similar to the model used in the construction industry. As California modifies the state employment regulations, construction contractors are wondering how the new “gig worker” law affects their day-to-day business operations and, more importantly, their bottom-line. The change will affect millions of workers statewide, but the good news is the law will likely have little effect on the construction industry right now. While the legislation, Assembly Bill No. 5 (“AB 5”), narrows the definition of “independent contractor”, subcontractors in the construction industry are exempt.

AB 5 seeks to stop the misclassification of workers and grant more individuals eligibility for standard employment benefits such as union memberships, health insurance and an hourly wage. AB 5 exempts specified occupations from application of the new definition and regulation. There are a wide range of exempt occupations such as licensed insurance agents, registered securities dealers, real estate licensees, and those performing work pursuant to a subcontract in the construction industry. It is important to note that this exemption does not apply to subcontractors providing construction trucking services, and those individuals have a separate set of regulations under the law. AB 5 establishes that the exempt individuals performing work pursuant to subcontracts in the construction industry are governed by S. G. Borello & Sons, Inc. v. Department of Industrial Relations (1989) 48 Cal.3d 341 (“Borello”). Borello provides an eleven-factor balancing test which weighs the totality of the circumstances and was the test used in California prior to AB 5.

In addition to requiring the Borello test, AB 5 establishes seven additional requirements. The seven requirements are: (1) the subcontract is in writing, (2) the subcontractor is licensed by the Contractors State License Board and the work is within the scope of that license, (3) if the subcontractor is domiciled in a jurisdiction that requires the subcontractor to have a business license or business tax registration, the subcontractor meets the requirement, (4) the subcontractor maintains a business location separate from the contractor’s business location, (5) the subcontractor has the authority to hire and fire other individuals to provide or assist in providing the services, (6) the subcontractor assumes financial responsibility for errors or omissions in labor or services as evidenced by insurance, legally authorized indemnity obligations, performance bonds, or warranties relating to the labor or services being provided, and (7) the subcontractor is customarily engaged in an independently established business of the same nature of the work performed. If the contractor demonstrates that all seven are met, then the individual will be considered an independent contractor.

As other states decide whether or not to follow California’s lead, AB 5 will have an impact nationally. It is too soon to tell how this will impact the national construction industry long term, but for now, it is safe to say that AB 5’s current effect on the construction industry is minor and your company should continue its business as usual.

Author’s note: The information contained in this article is for general education information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation. 

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LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  BUSINESS  LEGAL 

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Beacon Roofing Supply Announces 'Beacon of Hope' Contest Finalists

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, October 7, 2019

Voting open now through Nov. 1 to reward Veteran homeowners. 

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 Beacon Roofing Supply, Inc. (Nasdaq: BECN) (“Beacon”) today revealed the 10 finalists in its first annual Beacon of Hope contest, a nationwide contest awarding deserving Veteran homeowners with new roofs. The public can vote for their favorite finalists now through November 1, 2019. Five winners will receive new roofs from Beacon, and five runners-up will receive $1,000 to help complete necessary repairs.

“We received dozens of stories about Veterans facing hardships including financial issues, unemployment, health-related issues and so many more,” said Jamie Samide, Beacon’s Vice President of Marketing. “Beacon of Hope was created to give back to our Veterans who could use some assistance with a basic necessity: a safe place to live. We hope the public is inspired by their stories and will help us in our efforts to provide these Vets with a ‘Beacon of Hope’.”

The Beacon of Hope contest finalists include (in alphabetical order):

  1.  Lori Lee A. – Turner Falls, MA

  2. Galen A. – North Port, FL 

  3. Donald A. – Redford, MI 

  4. John B. – Albuquerque, NM 

  5. Madison B. – Woodbury, MN 

  6. Betty F. – Suffolk, VA 

  7. Robert H. – Bremerton, WA 

  8. Rodney O. – Plant City, FL 

  9. Michael S. – Overland Park, KS 

  10. Ralph S. - Church Hill, TN  

Beacon will announce the winners and runners-up on Veterans Day. To learn more about the Beacon of Hope contest and read the official contest rules, visit http://go.becn.com/beaconofhope.

 

About Beacon Roofing Supply 

Founded in 1928, Beacon Roofing Supply is the largest publicly traded distributor of residential and commercial roofing materials and complementary building products in North America, operating over 500 branches throughout all 50 states in the U.S. and 6 provinces in Canada. Beacon serves an extensive base of over 100,000 customers, utilizing its vast branch network and diverse service offerings to provide high-quality products and support throughout the entire business lifecycle. Beacon also offers its own private label brand, TRI-BUILT, and has a proprietary digital account management suite, Beacon Pro+, which allows customers to manage their businesses online. A Fortune 500 company, Beacon’s stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the ticker symbol BECN.

To learn more about Beacon and its brands, please visit www.becn.com

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  MEMBERS IN THE NEWS 

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Contractors Counsel: Employers Need to Tread Carefully When Using Drones on Projects

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, September 30, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Courtesy of: Trent Cotney, Cotney Construction Law
WSRCA Legal Counsel


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Greetings WSRCA Members,

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), more colloquially known as drones, are the topic of conversation in multiple industries and are used in a variety of different applications. From delivery of a kidney to a transplant recipient to aerial photography, drones have a wide variety of applications. While drones are already being used on construction sites across the country, not many have stopped to ask what potential risks are associated with this use.

Drones provide a number of obvious benefits when used on a construction site. They can be used to decrease the amount of time it takes to complete a survey of the site and can be used to monitor progress on busy construction sites. Despite the clear advantages provided by drone use, contractors must be aware of the potential liability from using drones on a job site.

As drone use increases so does the risk that an accident may occur from using drones on construction sites. In September 2018, a drone performing an inspection of the Millennium Tower in San Francisco lost GPS signal and crashed to the ground. In January 2018, a pilot crashed a drone into a crane while performing a survey of a construction site in the UK. While these accidents did not result in substantial property damage or personal injury, they highlight the potential risks associated with using drones to perform surveys and other job site inspections.

It is not difficult to imagine a scenario where, as in the previous drone crash examples, a pilot loses signal or fails to properly pilot the drone causing the drone to crash and injure an individual standing beneath it. In 2014, a man was killed on a construction site when a one-pound tape measurer fell from a building striking him on the head. An average light-to-middle weight drone weighs in anywhere from 5 pounds to 50 pounds, more than enough to cause lethal injury to anyone struck by one falling from the sky.

The first step to ensure drone use on a project site does not result in any personal or property damage is to verify the person piloting the drone has the required qualifications. The Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) requires the drone pilot to obtain a Remote Pilot Certificate or be under the direct supervision of a pilot who does have the Certificate. Potential pilots must pass an initial aeronautical knowledge test covering topic areas such as regulations relating to drones, emergency procedures, and aeronautical decision-making and judgment.

Second, and working hand-in-hand with the first step, employers must follow the requirements found in the FAA’s “Small UAS Rule 107.” Part 107 provides operational limitations that include a limit on drone weight; line-of-sight requirements; flight responsibilities; and other important limitations employers need to be cognizant of.

Third, employers should consider whether the benefit of using a drone on the project is worth the potential liability stemming from an accident and whether the employer’s CGL policy covers accidents related to drone use. Many insurers require employers that employ the use of drone technology on job sites to abide by the FAA rules and regulations governing drones. Failure to abide by the FAA guidelines can result in your insurer denying coverage for any accident stemming from drone use.

It's clear that drones provide construction employers a brevity of potential benefits, however employers should ensure proper guidelines are in place to prevent personal or property damage on project sites. Employers should further evaluate, in light of the potential benefits, whether drone use is in its best interests.

 

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LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  LEGAL  SAFETY 

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IB Roof Systems & Antis Roofing Provide New Roof for Thomas House Family Shelter

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Tuesday, September 24, 2019

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Teams from both companies have dedicated their time and resources to the two-week-long project, which is set to be completed by early September. IB Roof Systems donated all the materials and products for the project, while (WSRCA Member) Antis Roofing and Waterproofing generously offered to provide the labor at no cost.

“IB Roof Systems is honored to have supported the incredible work being done at Thomas House Family Shelter,” said Jason Stanley, Chief Executive Officer, IB Roof Systems. “Through the involvement of Antis Roofing & Waterproofing, IB’s Contractor of the Year, we were able to provide top-tier roofing materials for safe and secure homes for the families being served by Thomas House Family Shelter.”

Charles Antis, the Founder and CEO of Antis Roofing and Waterproofing, continued, “Thank you IB Roof Systems for providing a complete roofing system for Thomas House Family Shelter! Thank you, Natalie Julien and her team, for building the model to lift families from homelessness on the way to their highest selves. Your stories inspire us. It is our pleasure to keep you safe and dry with our partnership with IB!”

The new roof is a major step towards the property’s official opening. The property will act as an expansion for Thomas House Family Shelter, increasing their capacity from 16 to 24 apartment units to house homeless families with children.

 

About Thomas House Family Shelter

For over 30-years, Thomas House Family Shelter has served the community by providing a safe, supportive environment and the resources necessary for homeless families with children to remain together while empowering them to become independent and self-sufficient. With a success rate of 90%, Thomas House Family Shelter continues to their impact by working with over 100 local community partners and over 175 dedicated volunteers annually.

To learn more about Thomas House Family Shelter, visit: thomashouseshelter.org.

 

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LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  MEMBERS IN THE NEWS 

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ROOF TALK: Service Contracts Can Help Keep Crews Busy During Slow Periods

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, August 19, 2019

Courtesy of: Trent CotneyCotney Construction Law, WSRCA Legal Counsel

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Roofing season is well underway, and your crews are likely beginning to feel the heat; both literally – from the summer sun – and instinctively – from an ever-growing backlog of work. However, sooner-or-later the weather and economy will render full roof replacements temporarily unrealistic for both your workers and your customers. When this occurs, your outfit cannot afford to sit idle as your competitors find ways to profit. Alternatively, you should consider offering servicing and maintenance options for you customers.

If you decide to offer service contracts as an option for your customers, your company will essentially agree to make repairs after a request has been made. Essentially, your company will be “on call.” A service contract should define the types of repairs that fall within its scope, dictate that the relationship is exclusive in the sense that the customer must come to your company when the customer’s roof is in need of repair, and whether payment is due upon completion of a repair or upfront. A service contract could enable a small crew of your workers to stay busy during the slow season, while not overcommitting your entire outfit should repairs become necessary during peak season. Additionally, a service contract can provide your customer with the peace of mind that any necessary roof repairs will be completed in a timely fashion by a reliable contractor.

By offering maintenance contracts as an option for your customers, your company will essentially agree to ensure that the customer’s roofing system is working in the proper manner by inspecting the roof system on a regular basis. The maintenance contract should define the specific types of maintenance included, the term of the agreement, and at what interval inspections and necessary maintenance actions will take place; for example, a 3-year term with bi-annual inspections and maintenance occurring in the spring and fall. Again, this could provide your company with steady work opportunities without encumbering your entire operation.

Both of these options can supplement your standard warranty and can be marketed to your customers as a form of value engineering; whereby you demonstrate that servicing and maintaining the roof during its lifecycle will save your customer money by increasing the roof’s longevity, and decreasing replacement costs by ensuring that the customer’s roof remains in a condition that accommodates issue-free roofing work. As the roofing industry becomes more and more competitive, incorporating service and maintenance offerings into your business model can help set your company apart from its competitors.

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Trent Cotney is the founder of Cotney Construction Law, a law firm that specializes in roofing and construction law. He is also Legal Counsel to the Western States Roofing Contractors Association

As a Member of WSRCA, you'll receive the following:

• 15-Minute FREE consultation with the Cotney Construction Law Firm.

• Legal support on all aspects of construction litigation and arbitration.

• CCL specializes in OSHA defense, lien law, bond law, and bid protests.

• CCL also specializes in construction document review and drafting.  CCL routinely represents contractors in the roofing industry.

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  BUSINESS  LEGAL 

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WSRCA Announces 2019-2020 Technical Committee Assignments

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Tuesday, July 30, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) recently announced its technical committee assignments for the upcoming 2019-2020 year.  These committees are comprised of contractor members that focus on current and continuing problems and trends in all aspects of the roofing market – including low-slope, steep-slope, waterproofing, safety and industry issues.  Each committee is dedicated to improving roofing — by keeping tabs on vital issues that affect the industry — and helping fellow WSRCA contractor members stay in-the-know!

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INDUSTRY ISSUES:

*Brian Butler, Chairperson, Wayne’s Roofing — Sumner, WA
*Mike Trotter, Vice-Chair, Front Range Roofing Systems – Greeley, CO
*Mike Wakerling, EC Liaison, General Roofing Company – Oakland, CA
Joel Viera, Staff Liaison, WSRCA – Morgan Hill, CA

 

*Tom Asbury – Summit Roofing Service – Manteca, CA
*Chris Bowman – Collins Roofing, Inc. – Lehi, UT
*Tyler Canaday – Madsen Roofing & Waterproofing – Sacramento, CA
*Chuck Chapman – Tecta America Arizona – Phoenix, AZ
*Dan Cornwell – CC&L Roofing – Portland, OR
*Ron Lloyd – Kokua Roofing Service – Kailua Kona, HI
*George Madsen - Madsen Roofing Company – Lacey, WA
*Everett Martin - Empire Roofing, Inc. – Billings, MT
*Bruce Radenbaugh - Bilt-Well Roofing & Solar – Los Angeles, CA
*Pete Schmautz - Star Roofing – Phoenix, AZ
*Nick Smith - AAA Roofing by Gene – Riverside, CA

*voting member

 

GUESTS
Sean Asbury – Summit Roofing Service – Manteca, CA
Leon Clark – ABC Supply Co. – Tempe, AZ
Scott Lelling – Polyglass USA – Deerfield Beach, FL
Tim Hart – Duro-Last Roofing – Grants Pass, OR
Paul Hitesman – Capitol Roofing Service – Sandy, UT
Mike Swartzer – IB Roof Systems – Irving, TX
Charles Trotter – Front Range Roofing Service – Greeley, CO
Shane Wakerling – General Roofing Company – Oakland, CA
Rob Worthing – Allana Buick & Bers – Palo Alto, CA

 

LOW SLOPE:

*Chuck Chapman, Chairperson, Tecta America Arizona – Phoenix, AZ
*Mike Trotter, Vice-Chair, Front Range Roofing Systems – Greeley, CO
*Rob Winkle, EC Liaison, RAM Roof Management – Thousand Palms, CA
Tom Papas, Staff Liaison, WSRCA – Morgan Hill, CA

 

*Tom Asbury  Summit Roofing Service – Manteca, CA
*Austin Barnhardt  Quality Roofing & Sheet Metal — Bozeman, MT
*Chris Bowman – Collins Roofing, Inc. – Lehi, UT
*Brian Butler – Wayne's Roofing – Sumner, WA
*Tyler Canaday – Madsen Roofing & Waterproofing – Sacramento, CA
*Andy Clarke – Roofing Southwest – Phoenix, AZ
*Dan Cornwell – CC&L Roofing – Portland, OR
*Nathan Graaf – Artisan Roofing – Kalispell, MT
*Kris Hitesman – Capitol Roofing Service – Sandy, UT
*Jackson Johns – National Roofing Company – Albuquerque, NM
*Wendy Marvin – Matrix Roofing – Vancouver, WA
*George Madsen – Madsen Roofing Company – Lacey, WA
*Steve Nash  Waterproofing Associates – Mountain View, CA
*Bruce Radenbaugh  Bilt-Well Roofing & Solar – Los Angeles, CA
*Stan Robinson – Pacific West Roofing – Tualatin, OR
*Pete Schmautz  Star Roofing, Inc. – Phoenix, AZ
*Nick Smith – AAA Roofing by Gene – Riverside, CA
*Mike Wakerling – General Roofing Company – Oakland, CA

*voting member

 

GUESTS—
Leon Clark – ABC Supply Co. – Tempe, AZ
Paul Hitesman – Capitol Roofing Service – Sandy, UT
Neil Nichol  CNA – Bettendorf, IA
Mike Swartzer  IB Roof Systems – Irving, TX
Charles Trotter – Front Range Roofing Systems – Greeley, CO
Shane Wakerling  General Roofing Company – Oakland, CA
Rob Worthing – Allana, Buick & Bers – Palo Alto, CA

 

STEEP SLOPE:

*Bruce Radenbaugh, Chairperson, Bilt-Well Roofing & Solar – Los Angeles, CA
*Ron Lloyd, Vice-Chair, Kokua Roofing Service  Kailua Kona, HI
*Stan Robinson, EC Liaison, Pacific West Roofing – Tualatin, OR
Chris Alberts, Staff Liaison, WSRCA – Morgan Hill, CA

 

*Tom Asbury – Summit Roofing Services – Manteca, CA
*Brian Butler – Wayne's Roofing – Sumner, WA
*Dan Cornwell – CC&L Roofing – Portland, OR
*Nathan Graaf – Artisan Roofing – Kalispell, MT
*George Madsen – Madsen Roofing Company – Lacey, WA
*Everett Martin – Empire Roofing, Inc. – Billings, MT
*Wendy Marvin – Matrix Roofing – Vancouver, WA
*Valorie Miller – Jim Brown & Sons Roofing – Glendale, AZ
*Travis Nelson – Brown Roofing Company – The Dalles, OR
*Mike Wakerling  General Roofing Company — Oakland, CA

*voting member

 

GUESTS—
Leon Clark – ABC Roofing Company – Tempe, AZ
Marc Dodson – Western Roofing Magazine – Reno, NV
Paul Hitesman – Capitol Roofing Service – Sandy, UT
Brent Robinson – Pacific West Roofing — Tualatin, OR
Shane Wakerling 
– General Roofing Company – Oakland, CA

Rob Worthing – Allana, Buick & Bers – Palo Alto, CA

 

WATERPROOFING:

*Andy Clarke, Chairperson, Roofing Southwest – Phoenix, AZ
*Tyler Canaday, Vice-Chair, Madsen Roofing & Waterproofing – Sacramento, CA
*Bruce Radenbaugh, EC Liaison, Bilt-Well Roofing & Solar – Los Angeles, CA
Sofia Pulido, Staff Liaison, WSRCA – Morgan Hill, CA


*Tom Asbury – Summit Roofing Service – Manteca, CA
*Chris Bowman – Collins Roofing, Inc. – Lehi, UT
*Brian Butler – Wayne's Roofing – Sumner, WA
*Leo Ibarra – Blue's Roofing Company – Milpitas, CA
*Jackson Johns  National Roofing Company – Albuquerque, NM
*Everett Martin – Empire Roofing, Inc. – Billings, MT

*voting member

 

GUESTS—

Dan Blue – Blue's Roofing Company – Milpitas, CA
Leon Clark – ABC Supply Co. – Tempe, AZ
Scott Lelling – Polyglass USA – Deerfield Beach, FL
Paul Miller – AVM Industies – Canoga Park, CA
Charles Trotter   Front Range Roofing Systems – Greeley, CO
Rob Worthing – Allana Buick & Bers – Palo Alto, CA

  

SAFETY & HEALTH

*Steve Nash, Chairperson, Waterproofing Associates – Mountain View, CA
*Stan Robinson, Vice-Chair, Pacific West Roofing
 – Tualatin, OR
*Kris Hitesman, EC Liaison, Capitol Roofing Service
 – Sandy, UT
Alec Ward, Staff Liaison,
WSRCA – Morgan Hill, CA

 

*Austin Barnhardt  Quality Roofing & Sheet Metal – Bozeman, MT
*Ron Lloyd  
Kokua Roofing Service – Kailua Kona, HI
*Wendy Marvin 
– Matrix Roofing – Vancouver, WA
*Valorie Miller  Jim Brown & Sons Roofing
  Glendale, AZ
*Travis Nelson  Brown Roofing Company 
– The Dalles, OR
*Pete Schmautz – Star Roofing, Inc. – Phoenix, AZ
*Rob Winkle – RAM Roof Management – Thousand Palms, CA

*voting member

 

GUESTS—
Marc Dodson – Western Roofing Magazine – Reno, NV
Darin Douglas – M3 Safety – Spearfish, SD
Hans Matheus 
– Eagle Roofing Products – Rialto, CA
Kyle Matheus 
– Matheus Safety Services – Fresno, CA 
Patti Matheus
 – Matheus Safety Services – Fresno, CA
Melissa Mulligan – M2C Consulting Services – Phoenix, AZ
Neil Nichol 
– CNA – Bettendorf, IA
Brent Robinson 
– Pacific West Roofing – Tualatin, OR 

Tags:  WSRCA UPDATES 

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ROOF TALK: How OSHA is Trying to Reduce the Burden on Employers

Posted By Chris Alberts, Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, July 22, 2019
Updated: Monday, July 22, 2019

Courtesy of: WSRCA Legal Counsel
Trent Cotney, Cotney Construction Law

 

Greetings WSRCA Members,
 
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is instituting a handful of new rules that took effect on July 15, 2019. The overarching goal of these updates is to streamline processes, decrease paperwork, and preserve funds. The final rule will lead to fourteen standards revisions related to record keeping, construction, and more. OSHA believes that companies in the United States will save up to $6.1 million annually as a result.  In this article, we will discuss these upcoming changes and explain how they will reduce the burden on employers.


COMPLIANCE MADE EASY
It might feel like OSHA is constantly lurking in the shadows, waiting to lash out against employers who fail to maintain absolute compliance, but their real motivations are much less sinister. OSHA wants all contractors to facilitate a safe project site. The citations and penalties incurred along the way are meant to improve safety. While OSHA is concerned with maintaining workplace safety nationwide, they’re also looking for ways to streamline compliance and lessen the burden on contractors.


CHANGES PENDING
This notion is best illustrated by OSHA’s recent move to scrap some proposed changes to its current lockout/tagout standards. Since the proposed changes had a high chance of increasing the burden on employers, the agency decided to hold off. Instead of reinventing the wheel and throwing employers into a frenzy, OSHA has decided to implement a series of distinct rules regarding lockout/tagout. OSHA is even encouraging employers to speak out to let them know if proposed rules are going to do more harm than good. OSHA must take a balanced approach. When new rules are too stringent, it throws off our industries and creates other problems. When new rules are too lax, it leads to more injuries and potential fatalities. 

 

OVERVIEW
Not all of OSHA's rule changes apply to the construction industry. For example, redacting feral cats from the definition of vermin isn’t going to have any serious repercussions for contractors. However, contractors should be aware of the following:

 

  • Employers must now post latitude and longitude data (or other location-identification information) on project sites with poor cell service.
  • The minimum breaking strength for lifelines has been reduced from 5,400 pounds to 5,000 pounds.
  • To preserve privacy, employers are no longer required to include their workers’ Social Security numbers on certain forms.

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LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  LEGAL 

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ASCE 7, Uplift Ratings and Warranties

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, July 15, 2019

Greetings WSRCA Members,

As a follow-up to the Western Roofing Expo Seminar “Roof Wind Speeds: ASCE 7, Uplift Ratings & Warranties” Brian Chamberlain of Carlisle Construction Materials is releasing his PowerPoint presentation to the WSRCA membership for their roofing design library.
 
An ongoing issue that frustrates the industry as a whole is the confusion in how a roofing assembly will meet the building code, will meet an uplift rating, and be warranted based on local wind speeds. Since local wind speeds is the common factor in all three, an understanding of how wind speed is used associated to each needs to be clarified. This presentation focuses on the process, from uplift to warranty.

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LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  TECHNICAL 

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The Trade’s Labor Crisis and How to Combat It

Posted By Kandi Hamble and Ashley Rannikar, Art Unlimited, Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Authors: Kandi Hamble and Ashley Rannikar

Company: Art Unlimited - brings Life to marketing. Providing roofing contractors and business owners digital marketing services since 1982.


On one side of the fence, people are struggling to find jobs. On the other side, employers are struggling to find qualified employees to fill those positions. Skilled trades have been especially hard hit. They are fighting against misconceptions and struggling to show the value they offer not only our communities but those who work the job.


When the recession started in 2007, it is estimated by the National Association of Home Builders that 70% of skilled laborers left the trade in search of a more stable career. Now that things are looking up, how many of those 70% have returned to the trade? Less than half. This is a brutal hit to a booming industry and economy. Additionally, Memphisdailynews.com reports that only one skilled tradesman enters the workforce for every five who retire.


In the face of these two obstacles, how can companies combat the hiring crisis? We believe the answer is to be a company worth working for - not just a paycheck, but a business who genuinely cares about your employees and improve their quality of life.


Everything you do sends a message. Here are three ways to overcome hiring obstacles from the inside-out:

 

  • Know your company purpose

  • Create your company personality

  • Change perception about your company

Know Your Company Purpose

As humans, we all look for purpose. We want our lives and our work to mean something. Time is our most valuable resource, and we want to spend it wisely. Knowing this, how does purpose fit into the jobs we choose? Purpose plays a major role, and while it may not always be crystal clear, it affects everything from how you feel about your job to how you interact with coworkers and customers.


Let me introduce to you two identical construction businesses in the same market.

Company 1 is a thriving company with a solid employee base. Turnover is rare, though they are almost always hiring because business is growing. People in the community know and trust this company.

Company 2, on the other hand, is struggling. They are always hiring because turnover is high. People inwardly groan when they see the company is working on something around town. Skilled people only work there if they are desperate.


What do you think the difference is between Company 1 and Company 2? The difference is in the leadership team.

 

  • The owner of Company 1 knows his purpose in the community. He is there to make it a better place to live and work. He knows his employees are a big part of making this happen.

  • The owner of Company 2 is frustrated by how difficult it has become to keep his business afloat. He takes his frustration out on his employees. He has lost sight of his purpose, why he started his business in the first place. He knows the owner of Company 1 and wishes his business could be thriving so well. But where does he start?


Do you think the owner of Company 2 can turn around his business? We KNOW he can! Let’s look closer at the owner of Company 1:

 

  • He sees his company as an integral part of his community. He has a purpose and is constantly sharing it. His work shows him carrying out that purpose.

  • His employees know the purpose of their work. They have ‘bought into it’ by working at Company 1. Each day is purpose-filled, which gives them the determination to see even the hard days through. They know the end result is improvement not only for the company but for their community.


Keeping this in mind, how can the owner of Company 2 –and you– use purpose to change the view of your company? How do you define your purpose? Here are four questions for you to answer for yourself. There is no right or wrong answer.

 

  1. What service do you provide? This may seem rudimentary, but it is important! How do you serve others through your company? This can help define your purpose. (example: We repair or replace roofs.)

  2. How do you provide your service? This could also be phrased: How do you treat your customers? What emotions do you want to evoke when your trade, your company, your brand is seen around town? What needs to happen to change this? (example: We communicate and care about those we work for. People are happy to see us.)

  3. What does your company offer the community? How do the services you supply help improve your community? What value do they give, either to individual families or the community as a whole? (example: New or repaired roofs keep families safe and their homes protected. This makes the community look good.)

  4. How do you give back to the community? This goes above and beyond selling your services. Think about how you can help your community through volunteering, donations, or education.


Defining your purpose is just the first step in changing the perception of your company. Keep in mind this will take time. At first, you will need to be very intentional about injecting your purpose into each decision. As time goes on it will become easier until you suddenly realize you are living and breathing your company's purpose in every action.

It all starts with you. By defining your purpose, how you improve your community, and how you treat others, you will bring change to your company. This will seep into your marketing and out into how the trades are viewed.

Create Your Company Personality

Did you know companies can have personalities? Going back to Companies 1 and 2, they each had different personalities based not only on who their leadership was, but what the purpose was.


Employees at both companies work hard, but at Company 1, they have fun doing it. A comradery has been built through teamwork and shared experiences. Coworkers are even doing things together outside of work hours. They feel valued by their employer.


At Company 2, employees work hard, get a paycheck, and go home to crash for a day or so before doing the grinding work all over. They feel like a number and unvalued. They don’t get along with co-workers and definitely don’t see them outside of work.


Which company would you work for?


One thing which defines your company personality is your core values. Having core values documented will work with your purpose to provide a code of conduct for your employees. Company culture and personality grow out of core values in action. They answer these six questions:

  1. What is it like to work at your company? Do you have consistent hours and fair compensation? Do you provide the resources needed for completing jobs? Do employees know what to expect when they start their first day of work? Do job seekers have a good idea about what they will encounter when they apply for a job?

  2. How do you treat your employees? Do you treat each employee fairly and with respect? Do you publicly appreciate and privately instruct on improvements? How do you show them they are not just working to make someone else a buck or two? Do you take responsibility for mistakes and work to make them right?

  3. How do you expect your employees to interact with others? This includes coworkers and people they meet throughout the course of the day. If they are working out in the public, they become advertising for your company and the trade they are working in. Anyone in the area will see and hear how they interact with each other.

  4. How should customers expect to be treated? Your customers will have expectations of how they want to be treated. Do your values and theirs align? Do your actions reflect your words? Practice what you preach!

  5. How are you involved in your community? What value do you add, aside from creating jobs? How do you pour into your community? Do people recognize you as a respectable business and get behind your work?

  6. How are you consistently showing your core values? From your online presence to in-person interactions, you need to deliver what you say you will. Consistency in all you do is critical to changing the labor crisis.

Keep your core values short, direct, and to the point. They must be easy to remember and act on. Putting these values into action will help you build trust with those who interact with your company. Stick to your core values and eventually everyone who comes into contact with your employees, property, services, website, and marketing will know what you stand for.

Change Perception About Your Company

What is the perception of the trade you work in? Changing the perception of the trades –and your company– may be one of the biggest ways to combat the hiring crisis. “Young adults often see vocational jobs as a grueling line of work offering no career advancement or financial and job security,” says the Washington Post.


In the quote from the Washington Post above, we see three major misconceptions to overcome. Grueling work, also often seen as undesirable hard work geared towards men only. Lack of career advancement and job security. Lack of financial security. How can you change these perceptions? Knowing your purpose and having a defined personality is a good start.


How can you get new people to buy into the trades? Drawing in a fresh perspective is always a great way to shake things up and make improvements, no matter the industry. How can you invite women into the trades? They have unique viewpoints and skills which can be a valuable asset to make the trades even stronger. On the flip side, if your employees are miserable working for you they will communicate that and this battle is already lost.


Thinking about career advancement and job security, how can the perception surrounding this be changed? If these jobs are considered low skill, changing the perception could be as simple as hosting workshops where interested people come to learn more about the job. Doing special training at your local high school could spark students’ interest while also giving them basic required skills. This could also help close the gap of gaining skills which may seem inaccessible. The costs of training and receiving lower pay as an apprentice may be doable for a young person out of school, but with a family comes greater responsibility.


What does financial security mean? This is different in each part of the country. Each day, millions of adults trade our valuable resource of time for a piece of paper which allows us to live in our homes, put food on the table, and clothe our families. It gives us the resources to get to work, church, school, and do fun things. If we worry about the paycheck we get, it affects each part of our lives – including our job. If the trades are seen as lacking in financial security then a large chunk of potentially great employees will not even consider such a career change.


Take a good, hard look at how your actions are affecting the trades. Your action - and inaction - speaks louder than words in changing perceptions. It all starts with you! Think about the message you are sending through your past and present employees. Treat them well, be clear on what you expect from them and from yourself.. Build a solid digital presence with consistent messaging in your website, job ads, and social media. Add in traditional media such as billboards, flyers, and newspapers. With each of these components, send a consistent message about working in the trades. Live and breathe your core values.


Everything you do sends a message. What message are you sending?


Kandi Hamble is the content editor at Art Unlimited. She produces great informative & educational content on a monthly basis for her clients’ websites & blogs. She loves improving her clients’ online presence through thoughtfully-crafted & individualized content. For more information, contact Art Unlimited, www.artunlimitedusa.com


Ashley Rannikar is an SEO manager at Art Unlimited. Her job is to increase website accessibility for users and search engines. She is an expert at increasing website ranking and a master at content writing. For more information, contact Art Unlimited, www.artunlimitedusa.com

Tags:  BUSINESS 

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Form I-9: Employment Eligibility Verification USCIS Form I-9 & Checklist

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, June 17, 2019

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As a follow-up to the Western Roofing Expo seminar “Top 5 Immigration Issues for Roofers” Cotney Construction Law/WSRCA Legal Advisor Trent Cotney is releasing the USCIS Form I-9: Employment Eligibility Verification to WSRCA members, as well as a helpful checklist.  Employers are required to have Form I-9 on file for all employees, whether they are U.S. citizens or not.
 
According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, federal law requires every employer that recruits, refers for a fee or hires an individual for employment in the United States must complete a Form I-9.

This is required for citizens and non-citizens. On the form, an employee must attest to his or her employment authorization. The employee must also present his or her employer with acceptable documents evidencing identity and employment authorization. The employer must examine the employment eligibility and identity document(s) an employee presents to determine whether the document(s) reasonably appear to be genuine and to relate to the employee and record the document information on the Form I-9.

The list of acceptable documents can be found on the last page of the form. Employers must retain Form I-9 for a designated period and make it available for inspection by authorized government officers.

The updated form replaces a version that was issued in 2016. The new form expires on Aug. 31, 2019.


• Download the I-9 Form Here

• Download the I-9 Checklist Here

 

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LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  LEGAL 

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Fighting the Opioid Epidemic with Care and Data

Posted By Chris Alberts, Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, April 29, 2019
Updated: Monday, April 29, 2019

Courtesy of: Alexander Acosta — U.S. Secretary of Labor


WASHINGTON, D.C. -- With National Prescription Take Back Day last week, the Department of Labor released new informationon what we have learned about the opioid crisis and how we are improving our effectiveness in overcoming its challenges.

In 2017, President Donald Trump’s administration declared the opioid epidemic a national public health emergency and directed all executive agencies to use every appropriate emergency authority to minimize the devastation. Since 2017, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs’ (OWCP) has dedicated significant resources to stem the abuse, misuse, and proliferation of opioids to protect 2.7 million federal workers from harmful opioid prescription practices.

The use of opioids to treat injured federal workers continued, virtually unchecked, until 2017. The capability to monitor dose level and duration by the department was not even available until operational changes were instituted that year. Since we started this effort, a series of successes can be attributed to the implementation of a four-point strategic plan: (1) effective controls, (2) tailored treatment, (3) impactful communications with employees and providers, and (4) aggressive fraud detection.

The strategic plan’s core is a process where the department continuously gathers information and analyzes data. The results yielded great progress:

• 51% decline in new opioid prescriptions that last more than 30 days;

• 59% decline in claimants prescribed a morphine equivalent dose (MED) of 500 or more;

• 31% decline in claimants prescribed a MED of 90 or more;

• 30% decline in overall opioid use; and

• 24% drop in new opioid prescriptions

A recent study highlights the unique challenges facing a legacy population of injured federal workers who have been prescribed opioids over an extended period of time. Specifically, the study showed that nearly 1 in 4 injured workers in this group had been prescribed a high dose of 90+ morphine equivalent dose. This is important because the higher the opioid dose, the higher the risk for misuse and overdose death. Higher doses, greater than 100 MED, have more than two times the risk relative to lower doses. Additional risk factors, including the use of extended-release opioids and the associated use of certain interacting medications, were also identified.

The legacy challenges needed to be confronted. All federal injured workers with a prescription of 90+ MED underwent extensive individual case reviews. Treating physicians were contacted and, as needed, nurses were assigned. Our goal was to work with the medical provider and injured worker to provide opioid treatment where needed, reduce the opioid risk level, and assist in securing the benefits needed for pain management. These efforts are continuing with second level reviews currently being conducted by a clinical team of pharmacists.

Tapering an addictive drug takes time and there are a host of interacting factors to consider, yet as the statistics prove, the intense focus produced a real difference. This effort is not the federal government deciding what is best for patients. Rather, the federal government is acting as a responsible employer by caring about its workforce and ensuring that employees are getting the treatment and support needed for what can be a challenging recovery.

We are committed to (1) engaging individual employees and (2) analyzing the effects on the employee population as a whole. To win this battle, we must embrace a strategy that pursues accurate information, continuously evaluates that information, and invests the time necessary to find the right, healthy solutions for individuals struggling with opioids.

Alexander Acosta is the 27th U.S. secretary of labor.

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LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

Tags:  LEGAL  SAFETY 

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Art Unlimited Releases Seamless Website Form Tester

Posted By Anna Anderson, Art Unlimited, Tuesday, April 23, 2019

This digital marketing company engineered a simple fix to stop losing online customers

 Art Unlimited, a fast-growing digital marketing and web design company in Minnesota’s Northwoods, just announced their new form-verification WordPress plugin, the FormTester 365. It’s designed to automatically test a website’s Gravity Forms every day and send a verification email to ensure they’re still delivering correctly.  With the eServices industry revenue growing by 18.5% annually, it’s time the busy business owner had a reliable, economical solution to stop losing online leads.

“How many times a year do we hear, ‘I tried to contact you, but your website form was broken.’? And how many more times do we not hear anything at all, because that customer has given up completely?” said Anna Anderson, CEO at Art Unlimited. “The FormTester 365 gives companies and customers the assurance that their website forms are working every single day.”

Once the Formtester 365 is installed, business owners can look forward to filing a single email every day (or even every week) and knowing their forms are working perfectly. No lost customers, and no lost time on manual form submissions.

It’s now more essential than ever for companies to know they’re not losing valuable leads through something as simple as a broken bit of code or a plugin update gone wrong: at least 49.7% of companies state their online forms are their highest converting lead generation tool!

A few of the FormTester’s earliest testers said, “It’s just like a morning alarm that goes off and lets us know that all is well,” and “We know every morning our leads, payments, and customer questions are coming through correctly.”  

When a business installs the FormTester 365 plugin to their website, it finds every page with a form and sets up automated testing for it. Each form is tested daily, and business owners receive a weekly report. They are notified immediately after any failed submissions.

The FormTester 365 saves companies the headache of losing leads and the inconvenience of running a manual form check every day—instead, they’ll be able to focus their energy on improving the content and methods that get people to fill out those forms in the first place.

You’re probably already over-checking your email: it’s time to make it worthwhile.

Art Unlimited is a team of digital marketing professionals who strive to maintain a balance within the constantly changing trends of the industry. Their goal is to ensure that their clients’ businesses succeed.

 

If you would like more information about the FormTester 365 or are interested in becoming a beta tester, please visit formtester365.com or email team@formtester365.com.

Tags:  MEMBERS IN THE NEWS 

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5 Steps You Can Take to Help You Build A Predictable Sales Model

Posted By Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Monday, April 22, 2019

Courtesy of: Ryan Groth — Sales Transformation Group, Inc.,

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The top 100 list provided by Roofing Contractor Magazine is really a special honor to achieve. When looking up and down the list each year, I recognize market leaders who I know are doing certain things better than everyone else. To be fair, the top line isn’t everyone’s measure of success for building their roofing business.  However, if you’re looking to become the best operator you can possibly be, just look at this list and you will notice a group of professionals that are inspired by the others on the list and are driven to innovate and share what they’ve learned to grow – which helps the industry grow. It’s a great honor to be on that list if you’re a roofing contractor. So, if you’re looking to find a way on the list or want to find yourself higher on the list, here are five steps you can take to help you get there.

The first step that your company should take is to designate a leader to oversee sales, after all the list is about the top line number. The “Sales Manager” is one of the Roofing industry’s most underfilled positions, however when filled properly it can be like switching out a four cylinder for a V8 engine for your company. Finding a good sales manager can be difficult, but with using the right tools you can identify the right competencies for the job.  From my experience working with several top 100 roofing contractors, grabbing a sales leader from a different industry can serve very well because they are used to more developed sales structures, which translates very well in roofing. However, be sure to screen them by using tools like I recommend – candidate assessment tools for example from Objective Management Group based in Boston, MA is a great way to identify Sales competencies. The biggest competencies that you’re looking for in a Sales Manager are: desire for sales success, commitment to do whatever it takes as long as it’s moral and ethical, the right outlook about themselves and your company’s future, taking responsibility (the opposite of excuse making), accountability, motivation, recruiting and coaching. Roofing technicalities are the easy part, they can learn that over time. Chances are, you as the owner have plenty of technical expertise, what you likely lack is the sales competency – which is where the Sales Manager comes in.

The second step you should take is making service and preventative maintenance a top priority. The reason I say this is that service repairs take the least amount of time to close, which makes the sale easier. When you can more easily sell to someone it’s more likely you will sell to many more people, which means you have a low barrier to entry to build many relationships and have a chance to provide a great experience for the client. It’s only when someone has worked with you can they refer you, and it’s only when you have referrals and repeat business do you build more and more trust in your market. If you know me already you’ll know that I preach that the big work comes naturally when you’re consistently focusing on the small work. As service revenue goes, construction revenue should go accordingly. Make sure that when you focus on service, also lock them into a preventative maintenance plan so that they only see your truck arriving at their property for years to come. At this point, you’ll be their trusted advisor and will be able to develop the scope and perhaps cut right through any red tape that could cause you to get your bid shopped out and must compete more heavily on price.

The third step you should take is to get a grip on your sales pipeline. Too often do I see in the roofing industry a “bid it and forget it” mentality. First, they jump right into the presentation of the bid upon invitation without slowing the process down to ask great questions and listen. The only question that most roofers ask when they get to a lead is “where’s your leak”? They don’t learn what is the real problem that’s a compelling reason to buy. The best management of the sales opportunity is when there’s urgency discussed before gathering the real qualification questions, like what they think a roof costs and their decision criteria and timeline. Too many times do I see the roofing industry have “happy ears” which describes contractors getting all excited about an opportunity and not having healthy skepticism. In fact, Objective Management Group has data of over 3,000 specialty contractor sales people and the findings say that we are in the bottom 11% in consultative selling and qualifying competencies out of 1.8 million sales people around the world. Our industry really stinks at managing the pipeline, but if worked on it can pay huge dividends. I’ve seen it occur myself while working with many of the top 100 roofers on this list.

The fourth step you should take is to get a sales pipeline CRM program. Did I just say a curse word, CRM? AH!!! Yes, you need to be able to see what’s going on in your future sales opportunities anytime you want. However, if you really want to see revenue grow then you should score each deal in the pipeline and hold everyone accountable to the appropriate expectations to drive more pipeline. Each deal should be followed up on until a decision is made along with a status of when the decision will be made.

The fifth and final step you should take to help you get on the top 100 list is to set goals. Goals should be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time sensitive. You should really consider what is it that you want to achieve and to reverse engineer what it’s going to take to achieve it. It would really help if your sales manager and you came up with a compensation plan that matched these goals and held your sales people and estimators accountable for performing these activities. I also want to be clear with something, just because you don’t have a true “salesperson” right now, doesn’t mean you can’t incorporate these things. One of my favorite lines is “on the way to perfect, you pass up a lot of good”. The principle that I take from this (and teach my clients) is to get started, and don’t expect perfection right away. Tiger Woods said recently in an interview when talking about Lebron James, “anyone can be great for a week, a month, a year. But can you be great for a decade, two decades? What Lebron is doing is unbelievable because he’s doing it for such a long time.”  In closing, you should think about getting on the Roofing top 100! But do what Tiger says, be on there for a long time. Can you stay on there for five year, ten years, twenty years? I hope you can.

 

Good selling,

 

Ryan Groth

President — Sales Transformation Group, Inc.

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LEGAL  DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved.  All content (text, trademarks, illustrations, reports, photos, logos, graphics, files, designs, arrangements, etc.) in this Technical Opinion (“Opinion”) is the intellectual property of Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA) and is protected by the applicable protective laws governing intellectual property. The Opinion is intended for the exclusive use by its members as a feature of their membership. This document is intended to be used for educational purposes only, and no one should act or rely solely on any information contained in this Opinion as it is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney or construction engineer with specific project knowledge. Neither WSRCA nor any of its, contractors, subcontractors, or any of their employees, directors, officers, agents, or assigns make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party’s use (or the results of such use) of any information or process disclosed in the Opinion.  Reference herein to any general or specific commercial product, process or service does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement or recommendation by WSRCA. References are provided as citations and aids to help identify and locate other resources that may be of interest, and are not intended to state or imply that WSRCA sponsors, is affiliated or associated with, or is legally responsible for the content reflected in those resources. WSRCA has no control over those resources and the inclusion of any references does not necessarily imply the recommendation or endorsement of same.

 

Tags:  BUSINESS 

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Art Unlimited Releases Interactive Software To Give Free Roofing Estimate

Posted By Alec Ward, Western States Roofing Contractors Association, Wednesday, April 10, 2019

 

WSRCA Member Art Unlimited, a web design and digital marketing company in Minnesota’s Northwoods, just released their newest website solution, Decider 2.0. The software allows roofing contractors the ability to give potential customers a project estimate, before scheduling an in-person appointment. The flexibility of Decider 2.0 gives roofing contractors the freedom to customize their Decider 2.0 with the specific products they use, pricing, and company branding.

 

“Through our experience in the roofing industry, we have observed that customers hesitate before reaching out to a professional contractor, leaving them with unanswered questions about pricing and logistics,” said Anna Anderson, CEO of Art Unlimited. “We developed the Decider 2.0 to help serve that project specific information to the customer, narrowing the gap between the contractor and the consumer.”

 

Estimating the cost of a roofing project comes with a multitude of variables, which is one of the primary reasons roofing contractors are apprehensive to attempt project estimates, before doing an on-site visit. In order to accommodate such variances, the Decider 2.0 is programmed to display project estimates based on specific measurables like house size, roofing material, and manufacturers, all which impact the sum total of the project.

 

When a customer walks through Decider 2.0, they are given multiple options for material and price based on what the contractor offers. When the customer reached the end stage and completed their project, they get a detailed summary listing the materials they selected and the relative price estimate. This is also sent to the contractor when the customer fills out the contact form. The customer can request a time to discuss their project at this time.

 

Art Unlimited is a team of digital marketing professionals who strive to maintain a balance within the constantly changing trends of the industry. Their goal is to ensure their clients’ businesses succeed.

 

If you would like more information about Decider 2.0, please visit Art Unlimited’s website at www.artunlimitedusa.com or email info@artunlimitedusa.com

Tags:  MEMBERS IN THE NEWS 

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Condensation Potential & Damage Related to White & Light-Colored Roof Systems

Posted By WSRCA Technical Advisory Section, Tuesday, April 9, 2019

 

Greetings WSRCA Members,


Issues surrounding reports of condensation beneath light-colored single-ply roof membranes in some climates has been one of the more discussed industry-related topics over the past decade. Looking back, it appears that, building owners or tenants would report a mysterious “leak” or water intrusion into interior conditioned space and simply suspected that it was a leak likely associated with a weather event. As more and more of these situations were reported and then evaluated by the roofing contractor or professional roofing consultant certain patterns began to emerge in various climactic zones and general type(s) of roof assemblies.

Many of the similar roof system commonalities consist of mechanically-attached, white or light-colored single-ply roof membranes, installed over wood or steel roof decks with no vapor retarder. Of these roof systems reported as problematic, numerous lack multi-layers of insulation (with offset and staggered joints) and reportedly some have only one layer of insulation, and that is believed to have exacerbated the situation. As evaluations continued, the presence of interior-generated moisture as well as the lack of a vapor retarder and adequate ventilation was determined to be associated with condensation, forming on the underside of the roof membrane or roof deck, rather than a leak caused by some defect or puncture within the roof membrane.

WSRCA has been monitoring issues of condensation and moisture accumulation reported with mechanically-attached, white and light-colored single-ply roof systems, which were constructed without a vapor retarder, and we offer the following information to our Members. As this Bulletin will clarify not all roof systems may be appropriate for all climates.

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Tags:  TECHNICAL 

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